Highest ever level of referrals to LRC in 2010.

 

 

  • The Labour Relations Commission recorded its highest ever level of complaints from individuals to Rights Commissioners in 2010, a year when 15,671 separate complaints were made. This statistic emerged at the launch of the Commission’s Annual Report for 2010 by the Minister for Enterprise, Jobs and Innovation, Mr Richard Bruton, TD in Dublin today.

“The Commission is at the centre of the state’s support for the resolution of disputes in Irish workplaces” said Kieran Mulvey, Chief Executive of the LRC, “and the continuing demand from employers, workers and Unions for the efficient disposal of issues and problems by the Rights Commissioner and Conciliation Services is the key indicator of the effectiveness of those services”

  • The Commission handled nearly 17,000 disputes and issues across its Rights Commissioner and Conciliation Services in 2010 and in that same year only 14 industrial disputes leading to the loss of only 6,600 days at work occurred in the Irish economy. “It is a remarkable fact that even in the face of a severe economic crisis the actors in Irish employments continue to work together to resolve issues constructively without recourse to industrial action” said Mr Mulvey. “This is in sharp contrast to other larger European economies” he said.

  • Mr Mulvey went on to point out that the Commission’s Advisory Service, in 2010, commissioned major research to establish the reality of the human resource management response to the economic crisis. That research, presented at an LRC symposium in February, showed clearly the commitment to effective communication and engagement in Irish workplaces.

“Irish workplaces have a modern tradition of problem solving through engagement as well as joint exploration of the means to meet business challenges and it is clear from our research that this culture is underpinning our national drive to recovery at the level of individual enterprises” said Mr Mulvey. He went on to emphasise the focus of the Commission’s Advisory Service on supporting dialogue and relationship building in Irish employments.

 

  • The Chief Executive identified at the launch of the report that the Commission is a Public Service body with a record of responsive and flexible service to Irish employments. “The Public Service has a long tradition of extraordinary commitment to delivering good service and sometimes it is appropriate to acknowledge that negative descriptions of the work of Public Servants are very wide of the mark” said Mr Mulvey. “Continuing progress on Public Sector reform under the ‘Croke Park Agreement’ is evidence of that commitment”.

  • The Chief Executive went on to the thank Minister Bruton for his support for the work of the Commission and assured him of the Commission’s support for his work in continuing to focus on the infrastructure of the Irish industrial relations system with a target of developing synergies, efficiencies and a better service for all involved in Irish workplaces.

  • Minister Bruton also launched the Commission’s history of its Rights Commissioner Service written by former LRC Chairman Maurice Cashell on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Service. The evolution of the Service has taken it from an industrial relations ‘fixit’ service delivered almost exclusively by the late Con Murphy to one dealing not alone with industrial relations matters but also 32 separate pieces of Irish and European employment rights legislation from Unfair Dismissals to Payment of Wages and delivered by 15 Rights Commissioners.



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